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The Basics Of Slovenian Money

Money SloveniaMoney Slovenia

Slovenian money changed from the tolar to the Euro in January 2007, thus joining the other member-states of the European Union in adopting a single currency. Travelers to this tiny country may be happy about more than the exchange rate, however, as even though the currency may be same as other EU countries, the prices for goods and services are often cheaper here than elsewhere. A value-added tax is applied to most purchases, however, and this tax may or may not be included in the quoted price.

Slovenian money consists of the same seven Euro notes and eight Euro coins that are used throughout the EU. The notes are divided into denominations that include €5, €10, €20, €50, €100, €200 and €500, while the coins include both Euros and cents. Both €1 and €2 coins are in circulation, with the cents coins divided into 1,2, 5, 10, 20, and 50 cents. The difference between Euros in Slovenia and those throughout the rest of the EU is in its design, rather than its value. Although the notes are identical throughout the EU zone, the coins are designed with an image on the tails-side that is specific to the country that issued it. For Slovenia’s money, the images on the coins include:

Money SloveniaHistorical trivia aside, there is some practical information that travelers should be aware of concerning Slovenian money, particularly in the areas of foreign currency exchange, taxes, and costs. Beginning with the currency exchange, it is important to note that where money is exchanged will affect the amount of Euros received for the exchange. Banks, tourist offices, hotels, and private exchange bureaus can all change foreign currency to Euros, but they will all charge a commission for the transaction as well. The commissions will vary from place to place, so knowing where the lowest commissions can be found can help travelers get the most for their exhange. The typical commissions at some of the most common moneychangers include:

The costs for goods and services is often cheaper in Slovenia than in other nearby countries, with the average prices reduced by as much as one-third over the costs in Italy, Austria, and Croatia. However, a value-added tax of 20% is usually added to the purchases, although a lower tax may be applied to certain items such as museum visits, hotels, and food. While the tax may or may not be included in the quoted price, the general rule of thumb is that the tax is included in the cost of goods, but is not included for the purchase of services. A tourist tax may also be applied at hotels, although this is usually no more than €0.65 to €1.25 per person, per night.

Slovenian money changed to the Euro in 2007, thus adopting the use of the seven notes and eight coins that are legal tender throughout the European Union. The symolic images on the coins are specific to Slovenia, however, and point out the important notes of history relevant to this tiny European country. The exchange of foreign currency for Euros can be done at banks, exchange bureaus, and hotels throughout the country, although the charged commissions will vary from place to place. While the costs of goods and services is typically less than in neighboring countries, a value-added tax will be applied, which can make the total cost of purchases higher than the quoted price. The lower costs can still make Slovenia money generally goes farther in the long run, however, and the wide acceptance of both credit cards and travelers cheques can make paying for travel convenient, as well as affordable.

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