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A Glimpse On How Much Does A DJ Make

Some people think that radio DJs have one of the best and coolest jobs. They are like celebrities in their own way. Popular DJs can command a huge audience, with listeners hanging on their every word. However, whether it is a job that pays as well as other celebrities is a different matter. How much does a radio DJ make, people often wonder. Not a whole lot although it can still depend on where the DJ works, his experience and his ability to draw listeners to the show.Most radio stations operate 24 hours a day, every day of the week. Radio disc jockeys or radio DJs are often responsible for introducing a song and giving a few tidbits about the song or the singer. They try to keep the mood bright and cheerful, which can be a challenge especially if you are entertaining people that you do not see with just using your voice. There are also DJs that invite people to come to their show to discuss a certain topic.

Starting salaries for DJs is between £15,000 and £60,000 annually. In the UK, DJs on morning shows earn the most as this is the time when a large percentage of listeners are tuning in. DJs handling the afternoon and evening shows earn significantly less. Back in 1996, breakfast show DJs earn between £100,000 and £200,000. Mid-morning hosts earn around £60,000 to £80,000, afternoon hosts get £50,000 while evening hosts earn between £65,000 and £70,000. It gets lower during the late evenings onwards with salaries between £15,000 and £18,000. DJs working for small radio stations outside London earn lower salaries. This can be anywhere from between £17,000 and £120,000 annually.

Another factor is the size of the radio station itself. Major radio stations can shell out larger sums of money to DJs that can bring in more listeners. For instance, regular DJs on Virgin are paid between £90,000 and £150,000. Some of the biggest names on BBC earn between £115,000 and £1 million yearly. In 2006, Terry Wogan, the host of BBC’s early morning show, was said to earn £800,000 a year. At the time, the show had a total of almost 8 million listeners. In 2011, Chris Moyles extended his contract with BBC for an additional two and a half years for £1 million.